Breaking News: Fiduciary Duty Rule NOT Deleted by Trump

financial-advisor-fiduciary-duty-rule-trump

Were the reports profiling Trump’s ‘executive order’ that repealed the long-planned Dept of Labor implementation of a new fiduciary rule for investment advisors fake news?? Apparently Mr. Trump, along with whoever on his staff is drafting his first 100 days edicts in rapid fire fashion, as well as financial news media wonks and likely a whole bunch of other folks who thought that Trump was trumping the introduction of more regulations on the financial industry were all wrong. According to Michael Kitces of industry publication Bank Investment Consultant, it turns out that  The Fiduciary Rule was NOT Deleted by President Trump.

(Bank Investment Consultant) Feb 5 2017–Once President Trump won the election, it was widely believed it would be a matter of time before he issued an executive order to delay April’s rollout of the Department of Labor’s fiduciary rule.

Yet, the final version of the memorandum that the president signed on Friday did not match the originally circulated draft and it did not actually include a provision to delay the regulation after all, despite wide reporting to the contrary.

In fact, the final issuance was not an executive order at all, but a presidential memorandum. The key difference was that the section that would have proclaimed a 180-day delay for the fiduciary rule was eliminated, along with any direct guidance to the Department of Labor about seeking a stay to the rule given the ongoing lawsuit.

You can see the text here: Presidential Memorandum on Fiduciary Duty Rule..

WHAT IT SAYS (AND DOESN’T SAY)
Notably, nothing in the final version of this memorandum actually delays the fiduciary rule. (It appears that the original plan to seek a delay had been to rely on the authority of 5 USC 705 to postpone the effective date of the rule. However, the final rule already went effective last year, technically on June 7th of 2016, after the requisite 60-day review period under the Congressional Review Act had closed.)

The looming April 10 date is merely the applicability date on which key provisions of the rule will be enforced. There is no legal authority to delay.

Instead, the memorandum actually directs the Labor secretary to undertake a new “economic and legal analysis” to evaluate whether the looming applicability date of the fiduciary rule has harmed investors through to a reduction of Americans’ access to retirement products and advice, whether it has resulted in dislocations of the retirement services industry (that may adversely affect investors), or whether the rule is likely to cause an increase in litigation and the prices that investors must pay to gain access to retirement services.

To the extent that the new analysis reveals problems, the Labor secretary is directed to “publish for notice and comment a [new] proposed rule rescinding or revising the rule.”

In other words, all President Trump has actually done is to direct the Labor secretary to begin a new rulemaking process.

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and international securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation.

More information re capital raising and related investor offering documentation services via this link

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and international securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation.

More information re capital raising and related investor offering documentation services via this link

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Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and international securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation.

More information re capital raising and related investor offering documentation services via this link

- See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/#sthash.NOZS1bKT.dpuf

YET ANOTHER RULE TO COME?
The reality is that conducting such an analysis, and issuing a new proposal, and running a notice-and-comment period, is no small feat.

Bear in mind that the DoL issued its proposed rule in April of 2015, and took almost exactly a full year to complete the notice and comment period, gather the feedback and issue a final rule.

Also, bear in mind it took 4.5 years to develop that proposed rule, from the original proposed rule in the fall of 2010 (which in turn had its own notice and comment period).

It took the DoL about 5.5 years to issue a final rule. Yet, in this case, the DoL has almost exactly two months.

In other words, it took the DoL about 5.5 years, across multiple phases, to issue a final rule.

Yet, in this case, the DoL has almost exactly two months. And President Trump’s Labor secretary nominee, Andrew Puzder, still hasn’t even been confirmed. The Wall Street Journal reports his confirmation hearing has been delayed “indefinitely” due to questions about his ethics and financial paperwork. At the same time, Anthony Scaramucci, who was advocating against the rule, may not get the top role advising President Trump as was previously expected. That means, the timeline is not only very tight, but it may not even be clear who’s leading the charge.

REMAINING OPTIONS TO DELAY
Notwithstanding this challenge, Acting Secretary of Labor Ed Hugler did issue a brief statement just hours after President Trump signed the official memorandum, stating that the DoL “will now consider its legal options to delay the applicability date.”

As it stands today, the rule still has not been delayed, and the White House appears to have directly acknowledged that it doesn’t have the authority to delay the rule at this point.

Still, as it stands today, the rule still has not been delayed, and the White House appears to have directly acknowledged that it doesn’t have the authority to delay the rule at this point, given its decision to remove the 180-day delay language from the final version the president signed.

There are still a few potential tactics that could result in at least a partial delay.

1) Invite a stay from the court on one of the pending lawsuits. The first option: The DoL, facing lawsuits, could invite the court to stay the case – and potentially the rule, ostensibly while it further formulates its legal defense and/or begins to go through the proposal and notice-and-comment periods. The end result might be at least a temporary delay in the applicability of the rule.

However, there is still debate about whether this could actually delay the applicability date (or just the legal proceedings up until the applicability date hits), and this legal tactic could not be used indefinitely. In some reasonably timely manner, the courts would still expect the case to resume. While the tactic might be attempted, it’s still unclear whether the stay could last long enough to actually undertake the requisite economic and legal analysis, to draft a new proposed rule, to complete the notice and comment period, and actually finalize a new alternative version of the rule (or rescind it altogether).

In addition, a ruling is expected in the coming week on what is arguably the biggest DoL fiduciary lawsuit, a consolidation of those filed by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, SIFMA, ACLI, NAIFA, and more… and obviously, requesting a stay in the case is a moot point once the ruling is issued.

2) An expedited proposed rule that suspends/extends applicability date. The second option is that the Labor Department could try to hurry through its economic and legal analysis, and then quickly proposed a revised rule making perhaps just minor changes… including pushing back the applicability date. This would still appear to require the DoL to issue public notice and complete a comment period, and then get a final rule issued, all by April 10th, which may not be administratively feasible. Or at least, to complete its legal and economic analysis (perhaps focusing on the “easiest” point of contention, which is the third clause about the fiduciary rule causing an increase in litigation), issue a proposed rule for notice and comment, and then try to delay the applicability date of the old rule pending completion of the notice and comment period of the newly-proposed rule.

Overall, the biggest problem to delaying the rule remains that all of these strategies take time.

Pushing through a rule change so quickly, though, even if just for a change as minor as an adjustment to the applicability date, invites at least the potential of a legal challenge from the fiduciary advocates that the change was too hasty, arbitrary and capricious, and in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act; after all, many industry companies are suing the DoL claiming that its 5.5 year rulemaking process since 2010 was “too hasty”… so it would be more than a little ironic for the DoL to now complete a rule-change process (which includes a delay) in barely two months.

Expect a lot of people on both sides of the issue to be scrutinizing the Administrative Procedures Act, trying to figure out exactly how far into a new rulemaking process the DoL has to go in order to legitimately delay the applicability date of the already-effective rule.

3) A legislative fix from Congress. The only other viable option to entirely halt the rule would be an act of Congress. However, the Democrats still have enough votes in the Senate to filibuster the legislation. And with Sen. Elizabeth Warren issuing a letter to banks asking whether any have proceeded far enough in their fiduciary implementation that they’d like it to move forward without delay, and re-issuing its report cataloguing the “salacious” sales incentives/prizes offered to annuity agents selling into retirement accounts, it appears that the Democrats are still prepared to fight to keep this particular rule on the books (especially since there’s a clear endgame – they just have to make it to the April 10th applicability date, and then all firms will have had to comply, and legislation to delay the applicability date will be a moot point).

Overall, the biggest problem to delaying the rule remains that all of these strategies take time, and with the final applicability date just two months away, financial institutions have to continue to fully prepare for the possibility that the rule won’t actually be stopped.

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Trump Fires Fiduciary Rule: Back to Caveat Emptor for Retirees

trump-kills-fiduciary-rule-brokers-good-times-roll-

President Trump Issues First Dodd-Frank Unwind By Striking Down Fiduciary Rule; Goldman’s Gary Cohn to be Feted by Industry Peers for Influencing Trump Regime’s “Walk Back to Wild West..Let The Good Times Roll, Again!”

As evidenced by President Trump’s executive order signed today Feb 3, it appears it doesn’t matter to him or his new regime that the US DOJ aggressively defended the new fiduciary standards proposed for financial product brokers–which among other things sought to protect elderly investors from sleezy sales people and unsavory broker-dealers who prey on clients by gauging them with egregious fees and putting those less-educated and retiree investors into inappropriate financial products. Former Goldman Sachs Honcho Gary Cohn, who upon his recent appointment as chief economic advisor to President Trump along with new role as Director of the United States National Economic Council (and who cashed in $285 million of Goldman stocks to take the government job) is credited with the walk back to wild west practices in the banking industry and is being feted tonight by the heads of top investment firms at a special dinner at …Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach. According to event planners, the theme song for the dinner will be “Let The Good Times Roll, Again.” Attn: investors: CAVEAT EMPTOR.

WASHINGTON—President Donald Trump on Friday plans to sign an executive action that establishes a framework for scaling back the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial-overhaul law, part of a sweeping plan to dismantle much of the regulatory system put in place after the financial crisis.

Mr. Trump also plans another executive action aimed at rolling back a controversial regulation scheduled to take effect in April that critics have said would upend the retirement-account advisory business.

“Americans are going to have better choices and Americans are going to have better products because we’re not going to burden the banks with literally hundreds of billions of dollars of regulatory costs every year,” White House National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. “The banks are going to be able to price product more efficiently and more effectively to consumers.”

The fiduciary rule, unveiled last spring and set to go into effect in April, would restrict how brokers can provide retirement advice by forcing them to work in the best interest of their clients and generally avoid conflicts, which can come about with commission-based compensation. It stands to affect about $3 trillion of retirement assets in the U.S., according to research firm Morningstar Inc.

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and international securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation.

More information re capital raising and related investor offering documentation services via this link

Mr. Cohn said to comply with the rule, companies would be forced to offer retirement products with the lowest fees even if it isn’t best for their client.

See more coverage via WSJ https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-moves-to-undo-dodd-frank-law-1486101602/

 

Retrial Starts for Jefferies’ Former Bond Trader

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U.S. Federal Prosecutors Hope that Second Time is Charm in Case Against Bond Trader Alleged to Have Deceived Savvy Clients

(Reuters) Jan 3 – A former Jefferies Group Inc bond trader is going back on trial in federal court in Connecticut over whether he lied to customers about mortgage bond prices to boost profit. (Photo/Douglas Healey for Bloomberg)

The retrial of Jesse Litvak, with jury selection set for Wednesday and opening arguments for Thursday, comes 13 months after a federal appeals court voided his original conviction and two-year prison sentence.

But it gives U.S. prosecutors a fresh chance to crack down on alleged deceptive Wall Street sales tactics in the bond market, and could bolster cases against several other traders.

“The retrial will clear the air over whether bond traders can increase margins by falsely representing prices, which can distort trading and capital formation,” said James Cox, a Duke University law professor. “Whether someone relied on the information is irrelevant to prosecutions; it’s all about whether the underlying conduct is condemnable.”

C.J. Mahoney, a lawyer for Litvak, declined to comment, as did a spokesman for U.S. Attorney Deirdre Daly in Connecticut.

Litvak, who worked for Jefferies in Stamford, Connecticut, was charged in January 2013 with misleading customers about bond prices from 2009 to 2011.

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and international securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation.
More information via this link

 

This allegedly boosted the Leucadia National Corp unit’s profit by about $2.25 million, and his own pay.

Litvak has said his customers were sophisticated investors who were “inherently skeptical” of what counterparties tell them, and would have known if he were cheating them.

Convicted in March 2014, Litvak won a reprieve from the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in December 2015.

That court threw out fraud accusations related to the federal bailout known as the Troubled Asset Relief Program, and said Chief Judge Janet Hall, who oversaw the trial, wrongly excluded expert testimony for the defense.

BrokerDealer.com thanks Reuters and WSJ for providing source material-to continue reading the Reuters coverage, click here

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2017 Best Practices for Private Placement Memorandums

private-placement-memorandum-best-practices

With 2017 just hours away, Broker-Dealers anticipate the new year will include a resurgence of IPO activity as well as a material uptick in private placement offerings, stimulated in part by initiatives led by the Trump Administration. With this refreshing outlook, BrokerDealer.com curators will be providing a series of thought-leadership articles submitted by financial industry experts and professional service providers who counsel industry innovators and accomplished entrepreneurs. Below “2017 Best Practices for Private Placement Memorandums” is the first of weekly articles that will be posted via BrokerDealer.com..

 

Private Placement Memorandum: A Startup’s best friend for attracting investment.

If you are looking to raise capital for your business, you will inevitably need to utilize a document known as a private placement memorandum (PPM). This is a legal document that you can use to list down disclosures and selling points of your business for prospective investors. It is also known as offering document or offering memorandum.

When do you use a Private Placement Memorandum?

When it comes to selling equity in your company or raising capital via a debt offering for private enterprises in the United States, one needs to be more than familiar with and to follow the rules set forth by the Securities Act of 1933. This requires you to register yourself with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). One of the core elements of the documents you must submit is to explain why the offering made by the business complies with SEC Regulation D, which allows exemption for some companies from registering with the SEC. Regulators in Europe and other regions typically impose similar and sometimes more rigorous standards.

Paul Azous, the Founder/CEO of Broker Dealer LLC, which operates private placement advisory firm Prospectus.com  “The PPM lists down the securities being sold, the terms set by the company and numerous other elements. Also included are the disclosures according to the exemptions used, investor profiles and detailed information of the terms. It will however not include a general offer for investment, making it the perfect tool for attracting investment.

Where to start from?

Believe it or not, many businesses that rely on PPMs tend to work with templates found online, such as the PPM library, which contains more than 10,000 actual offering documents from companies in more than 100 countries and dozens of industries. Noted Azous, “In many cases, entrepreneurs seeking to raise capital will find themselves engaging a law firm that will charge anywhere from USD $25000 to upwards of USD $50,000 to create a PPM; but those legacy fees often prove to be out-sized when considering the deliverables.”

A PPM is a serious invitation for thoughtful and focused investors who want to know about your business, its future and most important, the profits that they can earn from it. If you go for ready-to-use templates from unreliable sources, you will likely end up with a dry, conventional PPM that will have numerous legal loopholes, which in turn can get you into trouble.

There are a variety of professional services focused on creating a bespoke PPM. This document will be tailored for your business and its prospective investors. The writer will work with you directly and use the information that you provide, ensuring that the final product highlights your company, its potential and why investors should take it seriously.

When you enlist professional PPM writing services, your business will be thoroughly analyzed by experts who will have a full understanding about your enterprise, along with identification of all the legal risks that can be obstacles for investment. They will also be able to identify the best possible approach for your business under the Regulation D of the SEC.

Will my lawyer help me in creating PPM?

A Private Placement Memorandum is a legal document. Using an experienced securities lawyer or a professional service provider specializing in the creation of investor documents makes good sense. However, while the PPM serves as a legal document; it is also a business marketing tool for you to attract investors. A lawyer should be able to draft a foolproof legal document, but in many cases they will lack in the creative thinking that is required to make your PPM attractive.

Professional service providers who specialize in private offerings should offer you advice, consultancy and insight about the best practices when it comes to attracting investors. They have presumably worked on PPMs for companies across a variety of industries, and ideally have cross-border experience to address the needs of Issuers based not only in the United States, but in multiple global jurisdictions as well. By choosing the right professional consultant, you will be working with people who actually know how to leverage a PPM document to raise equity for your company.

Contributor Samuel Goldberg is a 20 year private finance and investment banking veteran who currently serves as an independent consultant and a Board Advisor to PPM Group, a global advisory with offices in New York, London, Hong Kong and Tel Aviv. His knowledge base with respect to private placement documentation, capital formation and business consulting is based on dozens of projects in which he helped negotiate term sheets for multiple public offerings and private issuances that have raised nearly USD $2.5billion for a broad spectrum of companies. Mr. Goldberg’s area of expertise encompasses Reg D, Reg S and 144A issuance, stock exchange listing services, as well as the EB5 market.

2017 Best Practices for Private Placement Memorandums

Three Charged in NYS Retirement Fund Pay-to-Play Scheme

nys-retirement-fund-pay-to-play-scheme

Two former bond brokers for broker-dealer Sterne Agee and an ex-PM overseeing fixed income investing for the NYS Retirement Fund were named as defendants in a pay-to-play scheme that had the brokers plying former fixed income portfolio manager with plenty of partying and prostitutes in exchange for millions of dollars in fixed income commission fees, according to the office of US Attorney Preet Bharara.

The indictment says that there was an agreement among ex PM Kang, and Sterne Agee executives Deborah Kelley and Gregg Schonhorn to pay Kang bribes in the form of “entertainment, travel, lavish meals, prostitutes, nightclub bottle service, narcotics, luxury gifts, and cash payments” among other things, in exchange for fixed-income business.

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf
Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf
Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf

us_v._kang_and_kelley_indictment.pdf by Chris Bragg

The value of the alleged bribe was more than $1 million, Bharara’s office said, including such gifts as trips to New Orleans and Montreal, a ski trip to Park City, Utah, a $17,400 luxury wrist watch, tickets to Broadway shows and the U.S. Open, cocaine and crack cocaine, as well as thousands of dollars for strippers and prostitutes.

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link -

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Kang steered more than $2 billion in fixed-income business to the brokers, the indictment says, which resulted in millions in commissions.

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf

(Reuters)-Dec 21 U.S. prosecutors on Wednesday accused a former portfolio manager at New York state’s retirement fund of steering $2 billion in trades in exchange for bribes from brokerage employees, in the latest pay-to-play case to rock the fund.

Navnoor Kang

Navnoor Kang

Navnoor Kang, the ex-director of fixed income at the New York State Common Retirement Fund, was charged in an indictment filed in Manhattan federal court along with Deborah Kelley, a former Sterne Agee Group Inc managing director. Gregg Schonhorn, another broker-dealer whom prosecutors said paid bribes, was charged in related court filings (Reporting by Nate Raymond and David Ingram)

More Securities law news courtesy of Law360.com ….

 

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf

 

 

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf
Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf
Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf

law360-securities-law

Prospectus.com team of capital markets experts and securities lawyers specialize in preliminary offering prospectus, secondary offering prospectus and full menu of financial offering memorandum document preparation. More information via this link – See more at: http://brokerdealer.com/blog/finra-trying-transparent-easy-trick/#sthash.rckLtkFf.dpuf

 

  • BREAKING: Ex-Blackrock Exec Jailed In UK For Insider Trading

    A former Blackrock investment manager was sentenced to 12 months in prison by a London court on Wednesday for insider dealing stemming from trades in energy companies in 2011, in another win for the Financial Conduct Authority.

  • December 20, 2016

    Texas Man Charged With Bilking Investors In Ponzi Scheme

    A Texas financial adviser was arrested Monday on charges he cheated investors out of $6 million by selling unregistered securities in a purported digital advertising company that was really a Ponzi scheme, the Texas State Securities Board said.

  • December 20, 2016

    Chancery Mulls Largest Incentive Award Ever In Occam Case

    The Delaware Chancery Court opened a rare trial Tuesday for a so-called incentive award for the lead plaintiff in the class action that challenged Occam Networks Inc. merger with Calix Inc., which proposed at roughly $3 million is believed to be largest of its kind in the court’s history.

  • December 20, 2016

    RPM International Can’t Move SEC Suit Over $61M Deal

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge refused to move the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s suit accusing government contractor RPM International Inc. of failing to account for a nearly $61 million settlement, saying Tuesday the Ohio company hadn’t proven it would be more conveniently heard elsewhere.

  • December 20, 2016

    SEC, MSRB Fight GOP’s Challenge To New Pay-To-Play Rule

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board told the Sixth Circuit on Monday that it doesn’t have jurisdictional standing to consider the Republican Party’s challenge to new rules that increase pay-to-play restrictions on municipal advisers, saying the rules were created “by congressional will” and not by a final SEC order that can be appealed.

  • December 20, 2016

    Neustar Settles SEC Investigation Over Severance Clause

    Technology company NeuStar Inc. has agreed to pay $180,000 to end allegations that it violated a whistleblower protection rule by restricting what former employees were allowed to say about the company, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced Monday.

  • December 20, 2016

    Energy Co. To Pay SEC $1.4M Over Whistleblower Firing

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission reached its first settlement over internal-whistleblower retaliation Tuesday, with an Oklahoma energy company agreeing to pay $1.4 million, subject to a bankruptcy plan, to resolve claims it fired a worker for whistleblowing and used restrictive separation agreements.

  • December 20, 2016

    SIFMA, ABA Air Worries Over CFTC Cross-Border Swaps Rule

    The Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, the American Bankers Association and other swap market interest groups urged the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Monday to hit the brakes on proposed definitions for U.S. and foreign entities under cross-border swap rules, underscoring potential harm to the U.S economy and potential regulatory overreach.

  • December 20, 2016

    Schulte Roth Withdraws As Patriarch’s Counsel In Zohar Suit

    Schulte Roth & Zabel LLP told a New York federal judge Tuesday that it will no longer represent Lynn Tilton’s Patriarch Partners in a breach of contract case against investment funds previously managed by Patriarch, citing “irreconcilable differences.”

  • December 20, 2016

    Chancery Won’t Revive Suit Over OM Group’s $1B Apollo Sale

    Delaware’s Chancery Court has said it will not allow OM Group Inc. shareholders to reargue their recently dismissed suit targeting the company’s board members over its $1 billion buyout by Apollo Global Management, finding that the court adequately considered the evidence at hand.

  • December 20, 2016

    Tokai Hopes To Move $97M Suit Over IPO To Mass. Fed. Court

    Tokai Pharmaceuticals Inc. Monday sought to move a putative class action by investors claiming it withheld important drug testing information prior to its $97 million initial public offering to a Massachusetts federal court Monday.

  • December 20, 2016

    4th Circ. Says FINRA Challenge Must Go To SEC First

    The Fourth Circuit on Tuesday found microcap broker-dealer Scottsdale Capital Advisors Corp. can’t challenge the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s power in federal court, because Congress gave exclusive review of FINRA rules and decisions to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • December 20, 2016

    Citibank Renews Bid To Dodge $2.3B RMBS Class Action

    Citibank NA on Tuesday again asked a New York judge to toss a proposed class action accusing the bank of ignoring pervasive problems with residential mortgage-backed securities, saying precedent from a recent state appellate ruling supports its contention that the suit is inadequately pled.

  • December 20, 2016

    Bondholders Dismissed From Bank Libor Conspiracy MDL

    A New York federal judge Tuesday dismissed a class of bondholders from multidistrict litigation accusing big banks of rigging the London Interbank Offered Rate, saying their alleged antitrust injuries were not caused by the banks.

  • December 20, 2016

    Bankrupt Oil Co. Gives Preferred-Share Action The Slip

    A Manhattan federal judge dismissed a class action lawsuit against New Source Energy Partners LP and underwriters over the company’s $40 million 2015 preferred-share offering Monday, finding that the bankrupt oil and gas portfolio’s risk-disclosures were “precise” and “exhaustive” and did not run afoul of the securities laws.

  • December 20, 2016

    Morgan Stanley Pays $7.5M For Customer Protection Offenses

    Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC agreed to pay $7.5 million Tuesday to settle allegations it violated the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s Customer Protection Rule when using customer cash as collateral on loans used to finance hedging swap trades.

  • December 20, 2016

    Del. Supreme Court Upholds Chancery On TC Pipeline Case

    Bare claims of unfairness cannot overcome a partnership’s valid “special approval” shields for company decisions, Delaware’s Supreme Court said Monday in a ruling that rejected a master limited partnership member’s appeal of a losing challenge to a $446 million TransCanada Pipelines deal.

  • December 20, 2016

    $2.5M CFTC Spoofing Settlement Gets Green Light

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday signed off on a deal that settles a yearlong legal dispute between the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission and a Chicago-based trader accused of placing spoof bids on futures markets and who has now agreed to pay $2.5 million to resolve the suit before a trial.